Teaching listening to older second language learners: Classroom implications

  • Agata Słowik Institute of English Studies, University of Wrocław
Keywords: SLA, glottogeragogika, listening, older adult learners, lifelong learning in later life

Abstract

Listening is often listed as the most challenging language skill that the students need to learn in the language classrooms. Therefore the awareness of listening strategies and techniques, such as bottom-up and top-down processes, specific styles of listening, or various compensatory strategies, prove to facilitate the process of learning of older individuals. Indeed, older adult learners find decoding the aural input, more challenging than the younger students. Therefore, both students’ and teachers’ subjective theories and preferences regarding listening comprehension as well as the learners’ cognitive abilities should be taken into account while designing a teaching model for this age group. The aim of this paper is, thus, to draw the conclusions regarding processes, styles and strategies involved in teaching listening to older second language learners and to juxtapose them with the already existing state of research regarding age-related hearing impairments, which will serve as the basis for future research.

Author Biography

Agata Słowik, Institute of English Studies, University of Wrocław

Agata Słowik is a doctoral student in the Institute of English Studies at the University of Wrocław, Poland. She specializes in teaching and assessment techniques in teaching English to older adult learners. Her academic interests include L2 teaching and learning, SLA studies, the differences in teaching younger and older adult students, the use of students’ L1 in the language classroom, intercultural competence and foreign language teacher training.

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Published
2017-09-25
How to Cite
Słowik, A. (2017, September 25). Teaching listening to older second language learners: Classroom implications. Journal of Education Culture and Society, 7(2), 143-155. Retrieved from https://jecs.pl/index.php/jecs/article/view/10.15503.jecs20172.143.155