Exploring the Absurdity of War: A Literary Analysis of Catch-22

Authors

  • Anita Neziri Department of Foreign Languages, Faculty of Education "Aleksander Moisiu", University Lagja Nr.1, Rr “Barrikada” Tirane, Albania
  • Marsela Turku Department of Foreign Languages, Faculty of Education "Aleksander Moisiu", University Lagja Nr.1, Rr “Taulantia”, Durrës, Albania
  • Martina Pavlíková Department of Journalism, Faculty of Arts Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra B. Slančíkovej 1, 949 74 Nitra, Slovakia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15503/jecs2024.1.521.532

Keywords:

futility, dehumanization, craziness, timeless, war, psychological effect

Abstract

Aim. This study aims to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the absurdities inherent in combat events as depicted in Joseph Heller's novel, Catch-22. The study seeks to explore how Heller utilizes literary techniques such as sarcasm, black humor, and surrealism to portray the contradictions, irrationality, and overall absurd nature of war. Additionally, the study aims to unfold the deeper societal implications, including dehumanization and moral degradation, presented in the novel.

Method. The research method employed in this study is primarily a qualitative literary analysis. The analysis involves a close examination of the text of Catch-22, focusing on the novel's characters, plot structure, narrative techniques, and the use of literary devices. It engages in critical interpretation and evaluation of how Heller employs sarcasm, black humor to convey the absurdities of war.

Results. The study reveals that Joseph Heller employs a unique set of literary techniques, including non-sequential narrative, broken chronology, and cyclical motifs, to vividly capture the chaotic and absurd nature of combat events.

The analysis uncovers recurring themes such as bureaucratic absurdities, loss of personal agency, dehumanization, and the existential toll of war. The study highlights the significance of the Catch-22 paradox as a central motif, illustrating the circular and illogical nature of bureaucratic processes during war.

Conclusion. Joseph Heller's Catch-22 serves as a powerful critique of the absurdities prevalent in wartime. The Catch-22 paradox emerges as a symbolic representation of bureaucratic folly, encapsulating the struggle of individuals caught in the machinery of conflict.

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Author Biographies

  • Anita Neziri, Department of Foreign Languages, Faculty of Education "Aleksander Moisiu", University Lagja Nr.1, Rr “Barrikada” Tirane, Albania

    Dr. Anita Neziri is a doctor of science in the field of American literature; with the dissertation "Black Humor in the Prose of Joseph Heller" in 2017. She completed her undergraduate studies in 2004-2008 at the Faculty of Foreign Languages, English language branch. Master of Science studies at the University of Tirana, in the faculty of Foreign Languages, in literature, specifically American literature, started in 2009 and completed in 2011. She is a full-time Lecturer at "Aleksander Moisiu" Durres University since 2009.  Anita’s exceptional dedication to education and skills have earned her respect within the academic community. Her profound expertise and passion for advancing the field of foreign languages make her an inspiring figure in the realm of pedagogy.

  • Marsela Turku, Department of Foreign Languages, Faculty of Education "Aleksander Moisiu", University Lagja Nr.1, Rr “Taulantia”, Durrës, Albania

    Dr. Marsela Turku completed her university studies at the University of Tirana. In 2014, she received the title of Doctor of Science from the University of Tirana, Faculty of Foreign Languages, in the field of World Literature Studies. Since 2008, she has been working as a lecturer at "Aleksandër Moisiu" University, Durres. During this time, she has conducted studies, research, and publications mainly in the field of American and British literature but also in the didactic field. She has participated in many national and international scientific conferences, and she has published a considerable number of papers in various international scientific journals and two monographs as a single author.

  • Martina Pavlíková, Department of Journalism, Faculty of Arts Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra B. Slančíkovej 1, 949 74 Nitra, Slovakia

    She is a university teacher, senior lecturer at the Department of Journalism, Constantine the Philosopher University in NItra, Slovakia. She graduated in English Language and Literature from the Faculty of Education, Comenius University in Bratislava. She completed her doctoral studies in the field of Cultural Studies at Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra. She has also given several lectures and completed research stays at foreign universities. Her research is devoted to the literature of English-speaking countries, ethical behaviour in the mass media and modern trends in visual arts.

References

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Published

2024-06-13

How to Cite

Neziri, A. ., Turku, M., & Pavlíková, M. (2024). Exploring the Absurdity of War: A Literary Analysis of Catch-22. Journal of Education Culture and Society, 15(1), 521-532. https://doi.org/10.15503/jecs2024.1.521.532

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