Teachers’ Understanding of Evidence of Students’ Social Emotional Learning and Self-Reported Gains of Monitored Implementation of SEL Toolkit

  • Baiba Martinsone Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art, University of Latvia Imantas 7. līnija -1, Riga, LV1083, Latvia
  • Marco Ferreira Instituto Superior de Educação e Ciências, ISEC School of Education Alameda das Linhas de Torres, 179, 1750-142, Lisboa, Portugal
  • Sanela Talić Institute for research and development UTRIP Trubarjeva cesta 13, 1290, Grosuplje, Slovenia
Keywords: social emotional learning, teacher self-reflections, evidence of social emotional development

Abstract

Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight and analyse teachers’ responses to the evidence of their students’ social emotional growth and teachers’ own gains from the monitored implementation of social emotional learning in their classes.

Methods. The research group was composed of 312 teachers from Latvia and Slovenia, who were involved in the implementation of indirect social emotional learning through classroom instruction and formative assessment. A thematic analysis of the teachers’ written responses was performed.

Results. A thematic analysis of the teachers’ responses indicated that initially they had mentioned mostly (expressed) general statements and only some small part of their responses included observable and measurable indicators of students’ social emotional skills improvement. Therefore, four months after the beginning of the intervention, teachers reported rather on their personal and professional gains from the participation in this intervention than provided general statements.

Conclusions. The teachers’ improved self-reflection is a premise for them to consider evidence of students’ social emotional skills development thus facilitating purposeful social emotional learning in schools.

Author Biographies

Baiba Martinsone, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art, University of Latvia Imantas 7. līnija -1, Riga, LV1083, Latvia

Ph.D., is a professor of Clinical psychology and senior researcher in Educational psychology at the University of Latvia.  She is the co-author of the “Social Emotional Learning” and “Support to Positive Behaviour” programs for schools in Latvia. Her research interests include evaluation of teachers’ ability to self-reflect and assessment of social emotional learning programs’ effectiveness. She actively participates in several international research projects on promoting a mental health at schools and research of school climate.

Marco Ferreira, Instituto Superior de Educação e Ciências, ISEC School of Education Alameda das Linhas de Torres, 179, 1750-142, Lisboa, Portugal

Ph.D., isa professor of Education at ISEC Lisbon, Portugal. He is involved in several international research projects. He also is doctoral tutor and thesis supervisor at the University of Liverpool/Laureate Online Education, and part-time Professor at the University of Lisbon.

Sanela Talić, Institute for research and development UTRIP Trubarjeva cesta 13, 1290, Grosuplje, Slovenia

PhD candidate in prevention science and Head of prevention at Institute for Research and Development UTRIP in Slovenia. Her work is mainly focussed on bridging the gap between theory and practice through developing and evaluating of sustainable prevention systems, training of prevention workforce, and advocacy.

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Published
2020-09-11
How to Cite
Martinsone, B., Ferreira, M., & Talić, S. (2020). Teachers’ Understanding of Evidence of Students’ Social Emotional Learning and Self-Reported Gains of Monitored Implementation of SEL Toolkit. Journal of Education Culture and Society, 11(2), 157-170. https://doi.org/10.15503/jecs2020.2.157.170